Codes in Digital Electronics

Codes in Digital Electronics are used to communicate the information between computers. Codes can be broadly categorized into three categories 1) Weighted Codes 2) Unweighted Codes 3) Sequential Codes Continue reading

Work Manager Configuration in Weblogic

Work Managers allow to configure a set of guidelines that Weblogic Server uses to prioritize and organize the execution of tasks in an optimized way. Work Manager can be broadly categorized into two categories 1) Global Work Manager and 2) Application Scoped Work Manager. Continue reading

Grey Code in Digital Electronics

Grey Codes are unweighted codes i.e. these codes are not positionally weighted. In a weighted code, a fixed value or weight is assigned to each position with in a binary number. This is not the case with unweighted codes. Continue reading

Excess-3 Code in Digital Electronics

Excess-3 equivalent of a decimal number is obtained by adding 3 and then converting it to a binary format. For instance to find excess-3 representation of decimal number 4, first 3 is added to 4 to get 7 and then binary equivalent of 7 i.e. 0111 forms the excess-3 equivalent Continue reading

Half Subtractor in Digital Electronics

Half Subtractor is a combinational circuit that performs subtraction of two bits and has two inputs and two outputs. The two inputs denoted by A and B represents minuend and subtrahend. The two outputs are the difference “D” and the borrow bit “Bo”. Continue reading

Full Adder in Digital Electronics

Full Adder is a combinational circuit that performs addition of three bits. It consists of three inputs and two ouputs. Two of the inputs denoted by A and B are augend and addend bits that are to be added, & third input denoted by Ci represents the carry bit from the previous lower significant position. The two O/Ps are the sum ‘S’ of A and B and the carry bit, denoted by Co. Continue reading

Half Adder in Digital Electronics

Half Adder is a combinational circuit that performs addition of two bits. It has two inputs and two outputs. The two I/Ps are the two 1-bit numbers A and B designated as augend and addend bits. The two O/Ps are the sum ‘S’ of A and B and the carry bit, denoted by ‘C’. Continue reading